6 Right Ways to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a condition caused by nerve damage. This condition is one of the most common forms of dementia. What is meant by dementia is a collection of symptoms that cause mental function disorders. This disorder can be quite severe, so that it can have an impact on daily activities.

Alzheimer’s disease can damage a person’s memory and interfere with his ability to learn new things, consider certain things, communicate, to do daily activities. Luckily, there are several ways you can do to reduce your risk of this disease.

But beforehand, it’s good you know in advance the cause of this disease, so that preventive measures taken can be effective. Here are the causes and ways to prevent Alzheimer’s disease that is right for you.

Causes of Alzheimer’s disease

Until now, the cause of Alzheimer’s disease is not known with certainty. However, experts agree, that like other chronic diseases, this disease occurs due to various factors such as age, genetic or heredity, environment, lifestyle, and other illnesses experienced, for more information : Dymitr Kostrica- Neurolog

Although risk factors such as age and genes cannot be changed, other risk factors such as high blood pressure and lack of awareness to exercise regularly can be changed. Lifestyle changes are believed to help reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease

Living a healthy lifestyle is the key to reducing your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Here are the steps you can take to avoid this disease.

1. Regular Sports

Regular exercise is believed to help reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. Because, exercise can provide benefits to the brain by increasing blood flow and oxygen to the brain.

In fact, with regular exercise, a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease is believed to be reduced by up to 50 percent. Exercise can also slow the damage even further, for people who have experienced cognitive impairment.

2. Stay Social

Not only physically active, mental activity is also believed to help reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Mental activity can be obtained if you actively socialize with people around.

The relationship between social connections and Alzheimer’s risk until now is not very clear. But experts argue, this may be caused by social interactions that can trigger stimulation to strengthen the connections between nerve cells in the brain.

3. Healthy Eating

In Alzheimer’s disease, inflammation of the brain and insulin resistance can damage nerve cells, and interfere with communication between brain cells. Having a healthy diet can help reduce inflammation and protect the brain.

You are encouraged to consume more fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, olive oil, nuts, fish, poultry, eggs, and milk. You are also advised to reduce alcohol consumption and red meat, such as beef.

4. Mental Stimulation

People who routinely learn new things and keep actively sharpening the brain, have a smaller risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. You can do new activities, for example learning a foreign language, learning to paint, or diligently reading books and magazines.

In addition, activities such as playing puzzles, solving puzzles, and training memory, are also believed to help stimulate mental.

5. Enough Sleep

Enough sleep for 7-8 hours per day, can help prevent Alzheimer’s. Because during sleep, the body will produce more beta-amyloid, a type of protein that is useful for the formation of memory. Enough sleep is also believed to help get rid of toxins in the brain.

6. Reduce Stress

Stress that occurs continuously, can cause various damage in the brain. Starting from shrinkage in the memory area, inhibited cell growth, to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. You can take simple steps to relieve stress, such as meditation and yoga.

As a disease that is quite a lot suffered by the elderly, Alzheimer’s needs to be prevented appropriately from a young age. Old age doesn’t have to be synonymous with senility, right?